Through their passion for the practice, their drive to do good, and their optimism about the future of maternity care, the newest community cohort has already begun adding their contributions to the field of midwifery. Get to know the newest group of Birthwise Midwifery School students through these powerful excerpts from their admissions applications.

Inspired by these quotes? Birthwise is currently accepting applicants for the next midwifery program cohort. Learn more about the program and apply today!


“Living far away from my family and not having them present on the births of my children was difficult because I was completely alone. With this experience I realized how important it is for women to have a support system that feels like family. A support system that they can lean on and be confident with. Taking this course will prepare me with all the knowledge and the experience I need to assist women in childbirth. It also will enable for me to be a support and an advocate for them. I want to be that special support by providing the care they need. I also want to serve openly to every family.”

Gloria Agosto of Springfield, Massachusetts


“As a midwife, I would ultimately like to open a birth center and go on to guide and support other midwives with similar dreams. I want to work to advocate for midwifery care to become more accessible to all people who wish to receive it and I think an aspect of this is having different types of birth centers available in the same community. I believe so much in the need for midwives and midwifery care and I desire to be a part of the movement to make it accessible to all who wish to have it.”

Joanna Bond of Castro Valley, California


“I want to be a CPM who serves folks who are often overlooked and who don’t normally get non-judgmental and compassionate care. I want to center poor folks, rural communities, LGBTQIA individuals, and families and young people during my practice. I plan to do this by practicing in rural Arkansas….I would love to work with a community of midwives there and I would also like to practice advocacy work around reproductive justice and midwifery, particularly in the South as well.”

Emily Collie-Beard of Astoria, New York


“Once I learned about the mission of Birthwise and the dedication of midwife-based education, I knew that one day I would find myself in a space and time that I could manage going to this school. I am finally ready to take my passion to the next level and transform it into a purpose that continues to reach the lives of others. I am ready to take the next step in my educational growth and be able to continue evolving my infinite game of birthwork service. Through my years in the local birth and childbearing community I have been able to formulate what I really love about the work and why it will forever fascinate me and never fail to impress.”

Bianca Cothen of Lebanon, Maine


“Monroe has a population of 50,000, but there is currently only one CPM who serves the area. When it comes to quality care in birth, my community is grossly under-served. Not only do I recognize these shortcomings, but I’m passionate about making positive changes for the women in my community. As a midwife, I believe I can do that by implementing the midwifery model of care. Pregnant and laboring women deserve to be listened to, respected, and cared for in a nurturing manner. My hope is that one day, the stories I hear mothers tell will be filled with more contentment than disappointment, more courage than fear, and more joy than sadness.”

Megan Malta of Monroe, Louisiana


“Being able to nurture the whole woman through the duration of her pregnancy and afterward is very appealing to me; I feel that hospital care lacks that. I also see a great need for the home birth option in my community as there are no CPMs serving my county at this time. I look forward to the aspect of midwifery being not just about birthing babies but being for the whole woman through pregnancy, labor, delivery and the first weeks of motherhood…(and) making a difference in women’s lives by taking the time to talk through fears, educate about what to expect and how to prepare themselves mentally and emotionally for the great journey of motherhood that is ahead.”

Aura Moore of Machias, Maine


“After school I hope to start working with mothers of low income in my area. Women of minority and trauma are some of the most marginalized in the healthcare industry. Many in my community cannot afford proper care and when they can, usually they are not heard as they would like to be heard or treated in a way that reflects someone who has specific needs due to abuse in their past….These women are a strong reason why I continue on the path to midwifery. I would like to be able to give women care that will change their birth experience into a positive memory.”

Sabrina Pereira of Winthrop, Massachusetts


“I inspire to have a practice that offers massage classes and herbal therapy as well as full spectrum midwifery care and well woman care. I feel it is also important to reach out to middle aged and elder woman about connecting to their hormones and wombs and how to avoid being given a hysterectomy. There is much work to be done in helping in the process of the healing and empowerment of women in the world, and I am honored that I feel the call to help in these ways.”

Pamela Puriton of South Hero, Vermont


“After I complete midwifery school, I plan to help communities suffering from trauma. For example, my last doula client was an indigenous woman whose family belonged to a nearby reservation. For our meetings, I asked her mother to be present with us to discuss her birth history if willing. I was so grateful that she felt safe enough to share the birth traumas she experienced….It is in the sharing of these stories that we learn something must be done differently, affirming that our silences, as trauma survivors, do not protect us….This is what I want to accomplish as a midwife: ensuring women feel safe birthing healthy children into our World.”

Lisa Ricci of Rapid City, South Dakota


“It is of the utmost importance that social justice is connected in my work as a midwife, and it is my hope that my career as a midwife will benefit not only myself and my family, but my community as well. This is why after completing school, it is my goal to someday own and operate my own birth center in the District of Columbia to serve the underserved communities in the city. DC currently has a maternal health crisis, with one hospital recently closing and another’s labor and delivery unit being forced to close due to inadequate care of patients. There is currently no hospital for residents east of the Anacostia River in wards 7 and 8, where the majority of the city’s low income and black population live, to give birth in. Maternity care is difficult for many of these residents to obtain and this can unfortunately have deadly consequences….I believe more midwives working in the district will have a positive effect on all the birthing people in the city.”

Melissa Scaggs of Washington, DC


“Midwifery reflects my personal philosophy of pregnancy and birth in that I believe God gave women the ability to labor and deliver with little to no assistance. I believe that the practice of midwifery is to allow women to have a more personalized, intimate, and empowered birth….I love the idea that midwives are there to support and empower the mother. It is the mother’s time to shine, not the midwife’s or doctor’s.”

Journey White of Midland, Texas

Want to join these midwifery students at Birthwise? We are currently accepting applicants for the next midwifery program cohort. Learn more about the program and apply today!